Date: 02-12-20  Time: 06:02 AM

Author Topic: rear shock replacment  (Read 435 times)

philb

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rear shock replacment
« on: 19 September 2020, 08:45:08 PM »
just got myself a 2001 FZS1000
looking at getting the suspension updated
front forks to be stripped and serviced, new spring and re-valved ect,
rear shock has a few options
BMW s1000rr shock or new YSS shock with spring to match my weight but not sure what these units are like
what option would you choose?


if front forks come back cheaper to do than i ve put away i'll go for new nitron shock


b1k3rdude

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Re: rear shock replacment
« Reply #1 on: 19 September 2020, 08:57:09 PM »
The rule of thumb when it comes to YSS, is never ever fit them unless your desperate and absolutly need the bike on the road. Even then dont fit one, just buy a low mileage OEM shock it will be far cheaper and actually work better. (I have a OEM in good condition with I think 15k on it - http://foc-u.co.uk/index.php?topic=26308.msg317300#msg317300)

If some one on here has the BMW shock and thier weight is similar to your then unless someone corrects me, I would say thats a safe bet. Another option is see if anyone has a Devilsyam R6 modded shock £200-300. Or lastly if you have the cash there is an Ohlins with tool-less adjustable pre-load for sale on here £500 - http://foc-u.co.uk/index.php?topic=26390.0
« Last Edit: 28 November 2020, 09:14:19 AM by b1k3rdude »

bigfootpete

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Re: rear shock replacment
« Reply #2 on: 30 September 2020, 02:43:29 PM »
I fitted an Ohlins shock with a mate years ago - got it from E-bay for a reasonable price.


Right pain the backside to fit when you have large hands, much better than the OEM shock as you would expect though.
I've rarely adjusted it or had it serviced since fitting though - because I'm lazy...

ProdigalSon

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Re: rear shock replacment
« Reply #3 on: 21 November 2020, 11:03:23 PM »
So it's been a long time since I've been on here and I don't know if the person who bought my Gen.1 is on this forum but I fitted the 2011 BMW S1000RR rear shock to my bike and it was excellent, especially given that I only paid £100 for it in excellent condition. You have to drill the bottom fork hole out if I remember correctly to accept the stock Fazer bottom bolt, some have put extra washers in the top mount but I had a friend who made me new top hat bushes.
I put a post up at the time you should find it on a search, the best £100 I spent on my bike.

clunkie66

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Re: rear shock replacment
« Reply #4 on: 27 November 2020, 10:16:27 AM »
Has anyone had any difficulty fitting a Nitron road shock?

Gnasher

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Re: rear shock replacment
« Reply #5 on: 28 November 2020, 09:29:45 AM »
Has anyone had any difficulty fitting a Nitron road shock?

No, fitted a good few over the years, great shocks.  There's 3 types NTR 1 - 3, each number represents damping adjustment, 1, 2 or 3 way, cost goes up with each, all can be fitted with hydraulic preload adjuster at extra cost.  All are built to suit you and your riding style when buying new, if you buy second hand, check if possible what they had the shock built to or it could be too soft/hard to suit you. That said it could be rebuilt to your spec.  My advice if your planning on keeping the bike buy new, direct from Nitron using their website.     

These are the best replacement shocks out there in my opinion, even the base version is 100 times better than OE, R6 or BMW, as good as Ohlins this side of a track, half the cost like for like and it's British  ;)
Later

b1k3rdude

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Re: rear shock replacment
« Reply #6 on: 28 November 2020, 09:44:32 AM »
Morning Clunk

Using the search function would have helped you out fella, I did a quick search for the word nitron. There are a lot of posts, but PieEater appears in a few of them as I believe he has fitted one. So he is well placed to answer any fitting questions I would think.
  • Put bike on center stand and a plank of wood under the rear wheel that will just fit under without lifting the wheel.
  • Loosen and remove the lower shock retaining bolt with a spanner and ratchet.
  • Loosen and remove the lower dogbone retaining bolts with a spanner and ratchet.
  • Remove the side panels under the seat, then then loosen (dont remove just yet) the upper shock bolt.
  • Then with hold the bottom of the shock with one hand remove the top bolt and carefully lower the shock out
Now as you have the shock out this is a good opportunity to re-grease all linkage assembly, as this ALWAYS gets over looked by owners and shops alike -
  • Loosen and remove the upper linkage retaining bolt with a spanner and ratchet.
  • check all the seals (x6), the hardened spacers (x3), the roller bearings (x6) for wear or damage. You can buy replacements parts easy enough and if your bike has done 40k or more for the price this parts cost I would just replace the lot.
Marksman last time I checked do a full kit - https://shop.marksman-ind.com/index.asp?function=SEARCH
« Last Edit: 28 November 2020, 09:47:04 AM by b1k3rdude »

PieEater

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Re: rear shock replacment
« Reply #7 on: 28 November 2020, 11:06:48 AM »
Has anyone had any difficulty fitting a Nitron road shock?
Some great replies by Gnasher and b1k3rdude, they are very good shocks.

As Gnasher implies if buying second hand I would personally factor in the costs of sending the shock to Nitron and getting it serviced and resprung / revalved for your weight and riding style, or at least bare this in mind as something that you will need to do to get the best out of the shock and the bike. Nitron's service team tend to be quiet at this time of year so you may get a discount on servicing if you call them and ask for prices.

Fitting is straightforward and I couldn't add anything to what b1k3rdude has said, I use a chock for taking the weight of the rear when dissasembling the linkage as sometimes you might want to go up or down a couple of mm and a chock helps with this. I recall the top mounting bolt for the shock can be tricky to get to and I had to use a universal joint on my socket set but I don't have an extensive tool kit so other methods may work.

Obviously if you have any specific questions then post back.

clunkie66

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Re: rear shock replacment
« Reply #8 on: 28 November 2020, 07:46:48 PM »
Has anyone had any difficulty fitting a Nitron road shock?
Some great replies by Gnasher and b1k3rdude, they are very good shocks.

As Gnasher implies if buying second hand I would personally factor in the costs of sending the shock to Nitron and getting it serviced and resprung / revalved for your weight and riding style, or at least bare this in mind as something that you will need to do to get the best out of the shock and the bike. Nitron's service team tend to be quiet at this time of year so you may get a discount on servicing if you call them and ask for prices.

Fitting is straightforward and I couldn't add anything to what b1k3rdude has said, I use a chock for taking the weight of the rear when dissasembling the linkage as sometimes you might want to go up or down a couple of mm and a chock helps with this. I recall the top mounting bolt for the shock can be tricky to get to and I had to use a universal joint on my socket set but I don't have an extensive tool kit so other methods may work.

Obviously if you have any specific questions then post back.


Cheers guys, I should've said that I actually have the nitron shock. I managed to remove the old Hagon pretty easily but it's deffo a 2 man job. Thanks for the advice , I'll make sure that all the linkages are well greased.