Date: 08-12-21  Time: 19:11 pm

Author Topic: Fitting/Bending Replacement fuel lines  (Read 735 times)

CountFazer

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Fitting/Bending Replacement fuel lines
« on: 21 September 2021, 06:50:18 am »

Hi All,

There's a similar post on this regarding routing new fuel hoses by Friar (https://foc-u.co.uk/index.php?topic=27120.msg0;boardseen#new) but I have a slightly different question to ask.
I want to replace the 3 fuel lines from tank to carbs.
What have people done in the past?
  • Is there somewhere I can get OEM fuel hoses for cheap?
  • Has anyone got straight hoses and then shaped them?
  • Should I just apply the solution in Friar's post and get straight hose that is long enough to compensate for the tight space getting from points A to B?
I'm not sure how I should proceed.

Location: Sydney, Australia

Cheers



« Last Edit: 21 September 2021, 06:52:36 am by CountFazer »

Gnasher

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Re: Fitting/Bending Replacement fuel lines
« Reply #1 on: 21 September 2021, 07:59:38 am »
I want to replace the 3 fuel lines from tank to carbs.

Mate they're no fuel lines from the tank to the carbs.  There is 1 from the tank to the pump and 2 (supply & return) from the pump to the carbs, just clarifying things here :)  Why do they need replacing?

You've got a few choices either replace with:

1. OE either new or from another bike, this is the best option.

2. Fuel line any other bike that's same size and long enough.

3. You need to look for non braided fuel hose, it is available in various sizes.  It will be thinner (wall thickness) bend/form easier than braided which will have thicker walls and bigger OD.   Make sure the internal ID is correct to OE. 
« Last Edit: 21 September 2021, 08:04:02 am by Gnasher »
Later

BBROWN1664

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Re: Fitting/Bending Replacement fuel lines
« Reply #2 on: 21 September 2021, 08:01:11 am »
I guess you mean the pipe from the tank to the filter (I used a longer lenght of standard fuel hose to avoid kinks), from the filter to the pump (standard hose will work here) and from the pump to the carbs (standard will work here too).

The biggest issue is kinking the hose when lowering the tank so make sure you dont have any tight bends.
Another ex-Fazer rider that is a foccer again

CountFazer

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Re: Fitting/Bending Replacement fuel lines
« Reply #3 on: 21 September 2021, 08:12:01 am »
Thanks for the replies Gnasher and BBROWN1664.

My reason for replacement are:
a) I have sprung a leak on the hose from fuel pump to carbs.
b) Fuel lines are getting on a bit (they're a bit stiff) and due to me wrestling them on and off the fuel filter a few times, they have slight damage at the connection.

I could probably get away with only replacing the fuel pump to carb hose but I thought it'd be good to replace the lot.

Is it any value if I put my fuel hoses through a sleeve to ensure the correct shape and prevent kinking? Or even using hot water to shape the fuel hoses like the OEM hoses?
« Last Edit: 21 September 2021, 08:16:39 am by CountFazer »

Gnasher

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Re: Fitting/Bending Replacement fuel lines
« Reply #4 on: 21 September 2021, 08:24:22 am »
My reason for replacement are:
a) I have sprung a leak on the hose from fuel pump to carbs.
b) Fuel lines are getting on a bit (they're a bit stiff) and due to me wrestling them on and off the fuel filter a few times, they have slight damage at the connection.

Okay.  Them being stiff isn't really a problem as long as they don't leak.  They also rarely need to be handled, careful application of a hairdryer will help soften them ;)

The line that's got a leak can be repaired, cut the line where the split/hole is and insert a fuel joiner something along these lines
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/131229827851? or an elbow to get around bends https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/363181899217? 
Later

unfazed

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Re: Fitting/Bending Replacement fuel lines
« Reply #5 on: 21 September 2021, 02:31:38 pm »
The pipes from the filter to the fuel pump and fuel pump to carbs are no longer available, which immediately limits your options, but on the plus side do not have the range of bends the pipe from the tank to the filter has. Obviously buying OEM is the simplest option, but at a cost.  As stated previously a slightly longer pipe rerouted to prevent kinking is probably a good option.
You will need to be cautious with the connection to the carbs as this is plastic and can be prone to breaking as they become brittle with age. However these are still available, but usually need to be ordered.
Getting the correct I.D pipe and using a former to maintain the bend is probable the best option.
The pipe from the pump to the carbs has to able for pressure of 5psi as the pump operates at 0.2 bar about 3psi and therefore will need to be as thick as the Original pipe.
The sheath over the pipes can be removed with difficulty or alternatively use shrink wrap tubing as it is to prevent wear/damage from rubbing due to vibration.WD40 is your friend for reconnecting the pipes as it will not effect the pipes, but aids fitting, prevents corrosion and any excess will if it gets into the carbs and finally to the engine burn off.   
Try looking for the part number as NOS, New Old Stock or Yamaha Fuel Pipe NOS.

CountFazer

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Re: Fitting/Bending Replacement fuel lines
« Reply #6 on: 22 September 2021, 02:44:46 am »
Cheers Gnasher and unfazed for the replies. This is a massive help!
 
The fuel joiner solution seems like the easiest and will solve the leakage problem.

Although, I will probably replace all the old hoses due to wear around the ends of the hoses thanks to some impatience on my part when working on the bike. This is what caused my leak in the first place - lessons were learned. Thanks unfazer for setting out how to do this.



« Last Edit: 22 September 2021, 02:46:07 am by CountFazer »