Date: 24-10-20  Time: 06:46 AM

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Messages - Fazerider

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1
FZS600 Fazer / Re: ODD JUDDER ON SLOW JUNCTIONS ETC
« on: 03 October 2020, 11:20:35 AM »

My guess is that what you’re feeling is the chain. Obviously the top run goes from being taut to slack and then taut again as you roll off and then accelerate. I normally apply a gentle drag with the back brake to make slow corners smoother.
Check the chain adjustment is correct.
Having the idle speed set too low (or unbalanced carbs) also makes throttle response jerky.

2
FZS600 Fazer / Re: strange oil drip...
« on: 24 September 2020, 02:35:25 PM »
If it’s coming from the drain hole in the cylinder head it may just be a bit of seepage from the cam cover gasket.

3
FZS600 Fazer / Re: Clutch change query
« on: 20 September 2020, 01:09:29 AM »

I don’t think the pushrod can be set far enough in to cause damage when refitting pressure plate, but I’d wind the adjuster on the sprocket cover back so the you can tell when you have the plate on correctly.
The movement of the pressure plate in use is very small, a couple of mm perhaps.
 
Are these new springs the OE Yamaha ones? Many people, myself included, have tried aftermarket heavy duty ones which are far too strong and it makes the clutch very tiring to operate.
The Yamaha springs are just strong enough to do the job, but weaken over the years. That, or the use of unsuitable engine oil, causes the clutch to slip under load.

4
FZS600 Fazer / Re: Clutch change query
« on: 18 September 2020, 02:01:28 PM »

Sorry, having just re-read what the symptoms are, I think my last suggestion was wrong.
You say you've loosened adjustments at the lever and sprocket cover when they actually need tightening.
The lever adjustment admittedly, could be called loosening because you're turning the adjuster anticlockwise to tighten the cable. The bottom adjustment needs to go clockwise to achieve the same effect at the lever.
Also, check the sprocket cover and crankcase are clean along the mating surfaces before screwing them together tight. Dirt or looseness there will increase the distance the actuator needs to move before it starts pushing on the rod.

5
FZS600 Fazer / Re: Clutch change query
« on: 18 September 2020, 11:45:45 AM »

I  have always used the 8Nm torque setting.


I’m going to go back to my original diagnosis, the pressure plate is probably on in one of its wrong positions. I’ve never understood why they don’t warn about this in manuals. Perhaps they just like selling replacement plates.


Checking is easy:
See if the friction plates have any free play. If they can be moved slightly up and down the slots then the plate is on wrong.
If it is wrong, and has had the spring bolts tightened when in that position, take it out and inspect the bases of the wells that house the springs. If they’re cracked or broken you’ll need a new pressure plate.
Refit in a different position and press the pressure plate with one hand, if the plates are loose still, refit 60º further round. When the pressure from your hand actually squeezes the plates together it’s the correct position.

6
FZS600 Fazer / Re: Clutch change query
« on: 12 September 2020, 09:28:32 AM »
There’s a ball bearing that lives at the tip of the pushrod (clutch end). It’s very easy for this to escape while you change the plates. If that’s happened it’ll make clutch adjustment impossible.

7
FZS600 Fazer / Re: Clutch change query
« on: 03 September 2020, 12:26:59 AM »
Did you get the clutch pressure plate on correctly? The six possible positions are not the same. Get it wrong and the base of some of the wells that the springs live in crack. This makes the clutch light, and it’ll slip like crazy when you try to pull away.

8
General / Re: Head gasket busted?
« on: 19 August 2020, 09:44:35 PM »

When you get a mechanic diagnosing the worst possible cause for a problem on the basis of foc-all evidence, he’s really not interested.
There are lots of possible reasons for cooling problems.


Presumably the bike has a temperature gauge or warning light… was it reading hot?
Does the radiator get hot?
Had the fan come on?
Does the water pump work?
Are the radiator passages blocked? (If coolant changes have been neglected you can get a gelatinous, snot-like material forming which can block small pipes.)


If you’re not confident in your spannering abilities there’s no shame in taking it to a professional for investigation.. and if he sucks air through his teeth and tells you you need a new engine without eliminating the simple things, take it somewhere else.

9
FZS600 Fazer / Re: Need tyres - Recommended ones from you guys?
« on: 15 August 2020, 03:06:53 PM »

Another vote for the Bridgestone BT023 here.
I’m presently on the Michelin PR3/4 combo… they grip OK. Being of lighter construction, the lighter handling took me a bit of time to gain confidence. There’s anecdotal evidence that they’re also less resistant to punctures.
I’m not covering many miles since being made redundant, but if I ever wear these out I’ll go back to Bridgestone.

10
General / Re: Just out of interest. Who owns this site.
« on: 17 June 2020, 11:58:45 PM »
There was talk of contributions to pay the hosting fees many years ago, but that never happened. My memory is unreliable but wasn’t it Farjo who picked up the tab?

11
FZS600 Fazer / Re: Radiator fan
« on: 15 June 2020, 12:51:58 AM »
I took the fan off mine years ago. Even on very hot days in London traffic if the bike's moving at all it's fine. I turn the engine off when there is going to be a long delay, but tend to do that anyway to reduce pollution/save fuel.

12
FZS600 Fazer / Re: Clutch cable adjustment - sprocket end
« on: 15 June 2020, 12:40:50 AM »
To answer your question about holding the adjuster position while loosening the locknut… no, there’s no point.

13
FZS600 Fazer / Re: FZS600 has stopped working
« on: 07 May 2020, 11:00:35 AM »

Just wondering if your bike still has the original plug caps?
They were renowned for developing micro-cracks that let the spark track to earth. It’s sometimes possible to see that if you try starting the bike in the dark.
Note that a plug sparking OK when it’s out is not always a good guide because the compressed fuel/air mixture in the cylinder is harder for the spark to jump though.
NGK SD05F are the replacement caps most people use.

14
General / Re: Pigeons
« on: 01 May 2020, 09:07:38 PM »
I was always scared of doing that with the swans that had a habit of flying across the M3 at head height near Thorpe Park.
Fortunately the worst helmet strike I had was only a collared dove, but even that was a nasty moment.
Particularly for the dove.

15
General / Re: Do you still own a Fazer.
« on: 30 April 2020, 12:11:55 PM »
Well, sort of.
I have all the parts of one anyway.  :'(

16
General / Re: Black Iron Pans
« on: 11 April 2020, 01:38:50 PM »

Mine lost its coating after a few years, I switched to stainless.
The only issue I have with big iron pans is the cartilage in my left wrist is in a similar state to the teflon on my old frying pan and holding anything heavy gets painful.

17
FZS600 Fazer / Re: Rear Brake refurb
« on: 30 March 2020, 01:44:06 PM »

If you’ve avoided wet and salty roads it’s a fair bet that the pistons will be fine. I've never needed to split calipers... i see which piston moves easier then use a small G-clamp to hold it in while using the pedal to pump the difficult one out. Then piston pliers to wriggle the other out.
If the seals on the master cylinder haven’t been replaced recently I’d change ‘em. Yamaha say to do so every 4 years for all the hydraulics’ rubber components, though that is a bit over-cautious.
You can avoid problems with bleed nipples by greasing the threads when you put them in. And a squirt of WD40 down the hole after bleeding blows out that nasty hygroscopic brake fluid... just keep your face out of the firing line when you do. :)
Good tips thanks. Think I will invest in a pair of piston pliers. No rain or salt in 19 years ;) . Which seals is it in the master cylinder I cant tell in the fowlers exploded diagram.

Fowlers Item 6, the “Cylinder Kit, Master” is what I’ve bought in the past. It does include more than strictly needed, but I don’t think you can get the individual rubber parts separately.
As you probably know, getting air out of the back brake is a pain because the path the fluid fluid takes goes up and down. Air trapped in the master cylinder is best removed by slackening the banjo at the top.

18
FZS600 Fazer / Re: Rear Brake refurb
« on: 30 March 2020, 12:18:47 AM »

If you’ve avoided wet and salty roads it’s a fair bet that the pistons will be fine. I've never needed to split calipers... i see which piston moves easier then use a small G-clamp to hold it in while using the pedal to pump the difficult one out. Then piston pliers to wriggle the other out.
If the seals on the master cylinder haven’t been replaced recently I’d change ‘em. Yamaha say to do so every 4 years for all the hydraulics’ rubber components, though that is a bit over-cautious.
You can avoid problems with bleed nipples by greasing the threads when you put them in. And a squirt of WD40 down the hole after bleeding blows out that nasty hygroscopic brake fluid... just keep your face out of the firing line when you do. :)

19
Fazer 1000/FZ1 corner / Re: MPG
« on: 29 March 2020, 01:03:17 PM »

“A tankful” isn’t a very precise measurement. The point where the warning light comes on is quite vague and so is the point where you decide when to stop filling. Measure in actual litres over several fill-ups and you’ll have a more accurate figure.
For what it’s worth, I average 56 mpg from my Boxeye (but I weigh 60kg and try to avoid getting pulled over by traffic cops).

20
FZS600 Fazer / Re: R6 rear shock on the FZS600
« on: 01 March 2020, 09:55:14 AM »
Thanks MM.
Here’s a curiosity for anyone - would this R6 adapter negate the need for new dogbones:

https://www.projection-components.co.uk/r6-shock-adapter-fits-all-06-on-r6-shocks-17-p.asp


As the R6 shock is only 10mm too short I don’t think that adaptor would sort the problem, you couldn’t have the two mounting holes that close to each other.

21
FZS600 Fazer / Re: Oil issue
« on: 05 February 2020, 01:03:17 AM »

Warming it up once a week probably added a lot of condensation to the oil.
The level may have a bit low to start with, though not enough to cause the light to come on with the bike static.
Go for a prolonged ride and the sump finally gets warm enough to evaporate some of the water out and the level and density of the mayonnaise drops and the light starts to come on during acceleration.
An oil change and letting the bike get properly up to temperature every time should solve the problem.

22
General / Re: The future is electric………….
« on: 02 February 2020, 12:38:46 PM »
At the end of the day the world has only one single energy source – the sun.
And the Earth (geothermal)... and the moon (tidal).

23
General / Re: Autonomous vehicles survey
« on: 01 February 2020, 10:00:17 AM »
Quote
Yet I still want to punch that perma-grin off his face every time he’s on TV or radio...

Ah the joys of foc-u. :rolleyes


A member tries to start a discussion on autonomous vehicles, and what do you get?
A whole load of bitching, bile and somebody wanting to punch foc out of a high profile professor. :eek
What a nasty place this has become. :(


Excuse me?
You're normally at the forefront of all the nastiness, i can't believe you had the gall to say that?  :eek
Yes, but in his head he’s always on the moral high ground. He’s never found anyone irritating enough to resort to hyperbole. :lol

24
General / Re: Autonomous vehicles survey
« on: 31 January 2020, 08:46:57 AM »
Cox studied physics at the University of Manchester. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree with first-class honours and a Master of Philosophy degree in physics.

He completed his Doctor of Philosophy degree in high-energy particle physics at the University of Manchester.

His thesis, Double Diffraction Dissociation at Large Momentum Transfer was based on research he did on the H1 experiment at the Hadron Elektron Ring Anlage (HERA) particle accelerator at the DESY laboratory in Hamburg, Germany.

Cox is a Royal Society University Research Fellow, a PPARC Advanced Fellow, and particle physicist at the University of Manchester and he works on the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

He is working on the research and development project of the FP420 experiment in an international collaboration to upgrade the ATLAS and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment by installing additional, smaller detectors at a distance of 420 metres from the interaction points of the main experiments.

Cox has co-authored several books on physics including Why does E=mc2?[38] and The Quantum Universe, both with Jeff Forshaw.
Yet I still want to punch that perma-grin off his face every time he’s on TV or radio...

25
General / Re: Puncture repair kits (Roadside)
« on: 18 January 2020, 07:06:47 PM »

I use Crafty Plugger, it’s a really small kit that uses mastic-covered cord.
Bridgestone tyres and taking care to keep the bike on the cleaner bits of the road has meant punctures are a rarity for me. However, I’ve a PR3 on the rear at the moment and that did get holed a couple of years back. I was intending to take the tyre off and put a mushroom in, but never got round to it… the tyre’s holding up fine still.
Not sure if the company is still in business though, the website looks a bit unmaintained.
As for the pump, I didn’t fancy relying on an electric one that’s going to spend years under the seat before needed so opted for a compact bicycle pump.

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