Date: 22-10-20  Time: 01:57 AM

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Messages - Slaninar

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1
FZS600 Fazer / Re: Plastic FZS 600 Foxeye visor bolts?
« on: 09 October 2020, 09:06:18 AM »
Thanks for all the replies. I have conveyed the info to my friend, and will see what he decides.

2
FZS600 Fazer / Re: Plastic FZS 600 Foxeye visor bolts?
« on: 04 October 2020, 02:26:58 PM »
If they are the same size as fitted to the Gen 1 thousand, which shares the foxeye fairing, then they're M5 sized bolts. A search on ebay should turn up something. They're 14mm long if I remember correctly.


I'd say yes - around 14 mm.
Anyone know the OEM serial number?

3
FZS600 Fazer / Plastic FZS 600 Foxeye visor bolts?
« on: 04 October 2020, 06:37:03 AM »
Asking for a friend - where can one find those small condoms, that don't fall off?


 :rollin
Seriously - a friend had their Fazer slip and fall to a side, and the only real damage were the plastic bolts holding the visor pop off. And now he's looking for new plastic ones, that will break before the visor, so he can knock his bike down again, and again.  :)




All the images:

https://ibb.co/vdQkxv8
https://ibb.co/hXf1K3J
https://ibb.co/Z1JNhfb
https://ibb.co/4sj3B7j
https://ibb.co/cQkfZPB




4
General / Re: "Uncuttable" bike locks...?
« on: 23 July 2020, 12:33:16 PM »

"...You don't just run a red light without looking because "even when paying attention, I can still get killed..."

Were you saying that on behalf of the average cyclist? :stop


I did talk to a (female) driver who said something like: "when I'm scared (as in not sure if there's enough room), I close my eyes".    :rollin
True story.

5
General / Re: "Uncuttable" bike locks...?
« on: 23 July 2020, 05:51:56 AM »
Sounds good but A. They've got to actually make it into a chain first and B. I'm guessing once they do it would probably cost more than most of our insurance excess anyway haha

I always find the normal "unbreakable" locks to be quite laughable. Theres always a YouTube video showing someone cutting through them in less than 60seconds with a grinder so I question why anyone would spend £300+ on one that lasts 10seconds longer than a £100 one 🤷‍♂️
I just stick with the theory that a heavy/thick enough chain and a disc lock will stop the majority of have a go theives. If a professional thief wants it then there's not a great deal you can do to stop them
I also refrain from parking mine in public unless its 100% necessary. I feel sorry for those people that have to leave theirs parked up on a curb in London all day 😬, less so for the ones that insist on doing so with their £20k Ducatis but still


From talking with people who open the locks, from both "sides of the law", I have concluded this:


No lock is unbeatable - a security system without a weak point is useless by definition. Why? Because, security systems have to have a relatively easy, convenient way for those authorised to "unlock", and that's what often gets exploited. Of course, there's always the brute force approach to beating it, if all else fails.


Better (and almost always more expensive) locks require more knowledge, experience and tools to open.
10 to 30 more seconds with a battery powered angle grinder can make a difference - because those things do make a lot of noise. Not all the thieves are cool and level headed.


Boils down to this: thieves practically always go for the easier pray. If your bike is less expensive (looking), and better locked than the other bikes, why would they bother?


I'd also add my experience with bicycle locks. Every now and then, people come into my workshop with a stuck bicycle lock. Either something broken with the locking mechanism, or they loose the only key they have.
Most of the cheap locks get easily cut with relatively small cutters (those that fit under the jacket, often even those that fit in a pocket). That's no noise, almost zero effort, done in literally a few seconds.


Having said all this: I did "break" a few locks in the street, in broad daylight, with no one paying any attention whatsoever (could have been a thief). Still, if I were a thief, I wouldn't know if the owner would come by and see me, and I would probably be a bit more nervous and avoid locks that take more time and/or noise to break (based on my tools, knowledge and experience).


Bottom line:
Would I trust any lock to keep the bike from being stolen? No - no system in the world.
Do I think investing in a good quality (and expensive) lock is worth it? Definitely - because it highly decreases the probability of your bike getting stolen. That's all you can do.


It's a lot like riding a bike: you can get killed on your bike any day in traffic. But you're a lot less likely to get severely injured when paying attention, being careful (and, of course, wearing the protective gear). You don't just run a red light without looking because "even when paying attention, I can still get killed".


Of course, the fewer people invest in good locks, the safer a bike with a good lock is.  :)
So I'm almost happier when people don't take my advice on locks and security.   :rollin

6
The Laboratory ! / Re: Youtube video embedding broken:
« on: 21 July 2020, 01:14:10 PM »
From Serbia:
Firefox and Yandex show it fine, even with ad-blocker enabled.
Chrome doesn't show the video embedded.

7
General / Re: Focer font of knowledge Cycling
« on: 12 July 2020, 01:06:53 PM »
Interesting stuff Slaninar. My new 1.75 tyres arriv an al fitted and I am very pleased with them at £8.99 each.
I now think I would like to raise the handlebars but problem is its tight height where the bike is stored so I am looking at adjustable ones I can just drop down for storage but if I buy these  https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/110mm-Adjustable-Mountain-Bike-Handlebar-Riser-Angle-Bicycle-Stem-Extender/293625040556?hash=item445d6a8eac%3Ag%3AP8QAAOSwgtpe8vai&LH_All=1 will they just snap and kill me. Chinese crap.


Metal parts generally show signs of breaking on the outside (unlike carbon fibre ones). Thin - like a strand of hair, but visible.
"Zoom" make is sold here, locally, and works fine. Costing about 20 euros a piece.


However, I've never seen anyone use it to often change the position.


My main worry would be the bolt that holds the adjusted position (angle).
Would have to check - but I think that even if the bolt for fixing it snaps, it won't come apart immediately. It will start going up/down, but think that it's attached in a way that it won't immediately get completely detached.
I've seen some models with another bolt holding it tight from below, once tightened. It can't be seen in those pictures, even if it is included.
This one https://www.amazon.co.uk/Zoom-Adjustable-Stem-Ahead-Clamp/dp/B001RB21W6


Looks the part. It is also cheap Chinese part, but all I've seen have worked fine.
Still - don't see if it has two bolts to hold it in place.


Just make sure you get one that fits your steering tube and handlebar diameter.
https://bike.bikegremlin.com/3729/bicycle-stem-size-standards/

8
General / Re: Focer font of knowledge Cycling
« on: 11 July 2020, 07:40:04 PM »
Interesting stuff Slaninar. My new 1.75 tyres arriv an al fitted and I am very pleased with them at £8.99 each.
I now think I would like to raise the handlebars but problem is its tight height where the bike is stored so I am looking at adjustable ones I can just drop down for storage but if I buy these  https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/110mm-Adjustable-Mountain-Bike-Handlebar-Riser-Angle-Bicycle-Stem-Extender/293625040556?hash=item445d6a8eac%3Ag%3AP8QAAOSwgtpe8vai&LH_All=1 will they just snap and kill me. Chinese crap.


Metal parts generally show signs of breaking on the outside (unlike carbon fibre ones). Thin - like a strand of hair, but visible.
"Zoom" make is sold here, locally, and works fine. Costing about 20 euros a piece.


However, I've never seen anyone use it to often change the position.


My main worry would be the bolt that holds the adjusted position (angle).
Would have to check - but I think that even if the bolt for fixing it snaps, it won't come apart immediately. It will start going up/down, but think that it's attached in a way that it won't immediately get completely detached.
I've seen some models with another bolt holding it tight from below, once tightened. It can't be seen in those pictures, even if it is included.

9
General / Re: Focer font of knowledge Cycling
« on: 09 July 2020, 06:06:36 AM »
I have found some Michelin Country Rock MTB Tyre for my mountain (full suspension bike ) but they are 26x 1.75. My tyres on the bike are 1.95 and 2.10 - will the 1.75 fit.These https://www.chainreactioncycles.com/michelin-country-rock-mtb-tyre/rp-prod8547 very cheap but seem just right for the riding I will be doing.



I would expect it to fit. A rather conservative chart of which tyres fit which rim width (1.75" is 47 mm when it comes to tyre sizing standards):


https://bike.bikegremlin.com/285/bicycle-tyre-dimensions/#2
I have just twigged your avatar.

Your site was very helpful, I have come across a few similar about sizing and widths but seem to confuse more than help, nowhere could I find that definitely told me that 47 was 1.75 especially when 1.50 is not 1 1/2.
My inside rim is 19.40 so I am good to get the 1.75s which are on order - so thank you for your help.


Glad it could help. The site started by publishing my own notes - that I use to help myself (can't memorize everything always). After a wise friend told me I should put that on-line, so I can use it wherever I go, and "perhaps someone else could use that".
It's still used that way: the way I would like to have things explained to me.  :)


A few years later, I published the stuff that helped me keep the cycling site running, effectively making an IT website, done in a similar way (long, thorough, boring): :)
https://io.bikegremlin.com/


And, finally, just for fun, a personal blog, with stuff & nonsense, which I don't really expect anyone to read, but it feels good writing it  :)
https://blog.bikegremlin.com/

10
General / Re: Focer font of knowledge Cycling
« on: 08 July 2020, 06:23:26 AM »
I have found some Michelin Country Rock MTB Tyre for my mountain (full suspension bike ) but they are 26x 1.75. My tyres on the bike are 1.95 and 2.10 - will the 1.75 fit.These https://www.chainreactioncycles.com/michelin-country-rock-mtb-tyre/rp-prod8547 very cheap but seem just right for the riding I will be doing.



I would expect it to fit. A rather conservative chart of which tyres fit which rim width (1.75" is 47 mm when it comes to tyre sizing standards):


https://bike.bikegremlin.com/285/bicycle-tyre-dimensions/#2

11
General / Re: Focer font of knowledge Cycling
« on: 04 July 2020, 07:02:45 AM »
I don’t bother repairing them any more and just carry a spare tube for the price of them.
is there any reason why I should not buy a £3.25 tube from asda, £


From my experience:
Even the cheapest "Chinese" tubes do the job.
However, Schwalbe tubes seem to hold air best of all - that is, require the least frequent topping up (pumping up).


They also have good quality rubber, so even after 5, or 10 years, they are still OK and can be patched when punctured (Rema Tip-Top is by far the best for this).


Expensive? Yes - around double the price of the Chinese, if not higher. But 3 tubes last around 10 years, or longer. I just put the spare one into the tyre, and patch the punctured one, delegating it to being a spare tube.  :)


A thing I really don't like is when a tube has rubber valve stem. It can get cut on the rim sometimes, and it's more difficult to hold in place when inflating a flat tyre (no steel nut that holds the valve from dropping through the valve hole).

12
FZS600 Fazer / Re: FZS600 has stopped working
« on: 03 May 2020, 12:37:26 PM »
Fuel filter stuck with dirt? Fuel hose pinched somewhere?

13
FZS600 Fazer / Re: FZS600 has stopped working
« on: 03 May 2020, 10:11:45 AM »
To add, just in case: if the battery works OK, after many unsuccessful starts, carbs can get too much fuel. Starting it a few times (1 or so seconds on the ignition button) without any choke, or throttle, can help clear the extra fuel out (or water, whatever it is in this case :)  ).

14
General / Re: Do you still own a Fazer.
« on: 30 April 2020, 11:54:59 AM »
After the current boxeye FZS600, of all the stuff available on the market, I'd only consider a 400 cc Fazer - if they were available locally.
Intend to run it for as long as it runs without some outrageously expensive repairs.

15
General / Re: You've gotta love Haynes Manuals sometimes...!
« on: 30 April 2020, 08:29:50 AM »
When writing manuals, I often explicitly recommend how they should be used - similarly to what I listed here. After having read this post, I'm even more convinced that it is good to state the "manual for the manual" right at the start.  :)

I've written rules for Board Games and one of the most important parts is what's called "Blind Play Testing", where you hand the game and rulebook to a bunch of people who've never seen it before and sit back and listen.

You make notes of them saying "Hang on, what does that mean?" or "How do you do this?" or "Can I do that...?" and check that they can find the answers in the rulebook.

If they can't, you need to rewrite the rules and/or add examples to make it clear.

IMO this should be the case for *all* manuals :thumbup


It makes sense.


Though, I've had experience that some people ask about very simple instrucitons (like one A4 sheet of paper text, with clear, step by step instructios).
So the question is - did you aim for 100% question free, or just aimed for some threshold (like 95% or similar)?

16
General / Re: You've gotta love Haynes Manuals sometimes...!
« on: 28 April 2020, 04:03:58 AM »
So, planning on doing some work on my bike, I'm looking through the list of instructions in Haynes.


Ok, do that?


No problems.


Unscrew this?


Simple.


Move that out the way?

Easy.


Remove the rear shock?


Piece of ca...

Hang on?


What?!   :eek

You could have mentioned that at the start, instead of casually chucking it in at about stage 8 of the process...!!


When I'm learning something, or using a manual, it's easiest (for me at least) to do it like this:


- read the table of contents (if it exists)
- go over the entire material, from start to finish
- then go "in more detail" - in case it's not all perfectly clear from the first go. If it is, this can be skipped.
- if using an instructions manual, this is the stage when I would start doing it. Checking if I have all the needed tools, bits...


When writing manuals, I often explicitly recommend how they should be used - similarly to what I listed here. After having read this post, I'm even more convinced that it is good to state the "manual for the manual" right at the start.  :)

17
I think Kawasaki Versys is closer to the spiritual successor of the Fazer.
Maybe but it’s not a Yamaha.


Of course. But to me it seems "closer" to fazer than the MT Yamaha models.


Neither of those is the Fazer, of course. One matches it by the make, the other by the "concept".

18
I think Kawasaki Versys is closer to the spiritual successor of the Fazer.

19
General / Re: What the foc are you reading now!
« on: 14 April 2020, 09:04:12 PM »
Grahamm, you're absolutely spot regards the original Radio 4 series  :thumbup
I used to be allowed to stay up late on a school night to listen to it at 10:30pm when it was first aired back in 1978 - it was truly amazing and way ahead of its time.
Can you imagine kids today having to listen to the radio for their entertainment???!!!!
Those were the days eh?? :D


Wish I'd been a kid in '78 never mind listening to the foccin' radio. :lol


Some 12 years old, was alone home, reading The War of the Worlds (H.G. Wells). Serbocroatian translation, of course. While reading, on the local very cool alternative radio (dead now) - they played the novel, in English, with actors reading it. I had known English well enough at that time to understand it is the very book I was reading. And it was spooky - alone at night, with the dramatic voice from the radio... Really cool experience.   :)

20
General / Re: What the foc are you reading now!
« on: 14 April 2020, 05:26:52 PM »
If I had to choose one book, it would be "Hitchhikers Guide To The Galaxy" by Douglas Adams - quite possibly the best book ever written. Had me physically laughing out loud on many occasions and the only book I've read 3 times.


 :agree




21
General / Re: What the foc are you reading now!
« on: 13 April 2020, 02:33:02 PM »
Last ones:

Edward Snowden: Permanent Record - surprisingly well written. Take it all with a grain of salt, but it is informative, more than entertaining, or enlightening.


Isaac Asimov: Robots, Empire and Foundation series. I love Asimov and SF in general, while the link has all the books listed in their "in-book-universe" chronological order. Suppose it makes most sense reading them that way, though it's not crucial.


Now reading some Serbocroatian collection of Noam Chomsky's works - couldn't find an English publication of that "compilation". It's not bad, but not too good either, anyway.

22
General / Re: tyre life
« on: 13 April 2020, 02:07:09 PM »
If stored properly, even 6, or 7 years in storage is often fine. Tyres won't rot if stored properly. They might loose a bit of grip, but not too much.

This goes especially if the pavement where you ride has enough rocks in it, so that it is grippy. A guy I met from England explained how UK pavement is a lot less slippery then in our country, but the downside is that tyres get worn a lot faster.

Once a tyre is mounted, the "real" aging starts. Pressure, exposure to sun, cold, heating and cooling cycles. That is when tyres start to loose their attributes, even if they are not physically worn. So, depending on the motorcycle storing and riding conditions, after 2 to max. 5 years - replacement is needed. Sooner if they get worn, ofcourse. Or if a motorcycle is parked and left in direct sunlight, for days and months (especially in the summer).

Wrote at great length about when should a bicycle tyre be replaced. It's not the same as with motorcycles, but some things are similar enough.
Though - Metzeller for example makes steel tyre casing (at least the models I've used), while Michelin and Continental for example, use some sort of fabric - that can be cut more easily and can rot more quickly.

23
General / Re: The pissing contest
« on: 08 April 2020, 01:53:02 PM »
Quote
I actually got bored doing it and lost interest.
Yes the second one is a bit tricky  :b :pokefun


Yup - I often don't pull long enough and end up in neutral!

24
General / Re: The pissing contest
« on: 07 April 2020, 10:02:18 AM »
Hope everyone is doing fine. I found this interesting over the weekend to pass some time and take my thoughts off the grim present situation:


https://test.mensa.no/


P.S: I do believe the test is flawed, because, instead of the results, it keeps showing my shoe size. Could be my browser, or something.


Let me just say something, there is NEVER a good time to do that test. From half way onwards was not a comfortable feeling at all.  :lol


While we may never get to Mensa - we'll always have FOC!  :)

25
General / The pissing contest
« on: 06 April 2020, 10:36:26 AM »
Hope everyone is doing fine. I found this interesting over the weekend to pass some time and take my thoughts off the grim present situation:


https://test.mensa.no/


P.S: I do believe the test is flawed, because, instead of the results, it keeps showing my shoe size. Could be my browser, or something.

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