Date: 21-11-17  Time: 04:31 AM

Author Topic: Ivan's Jet Kit Installation Guide by Mike the Falcon  (Read 10645 times)

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Ivan's Jet Kit Installation Guide by Mike the Falcon
« on: 02 January 2011, 08:11:25 PM »
Introduction



I have fitted Ivan’s jet kits is to several hundred Fazer 1000s and in the process picked up a few tricks to make the job a little easier and quicker.
Like the saying goes, experience is what you get just after you needed it.   

What follows is a step-by-step description of the process which should be read in conjunction with the illustrated guides on Pat Glenn’s excellent site.
Please note that the text accompanying my part of the installation guide there was written in 2004.  What you are about to read is an updated version which takes account of the things I have learned since then.

This guide covers the fitting of Ivan’s Slip-On jet kit which works well with either the standard end can or an aftermarket can. 
For those requiring more peak power there are further mods to the airbox lid and the carb inlet stubs which offer an extra 5- 8bhp above 8,000 rpm. These mods require Ivan’s MB jet kit, a K&N type air filter and a less restrictive aftermarket can.

If you are thinking about fitting Ivan’s kit yourself, the first thing you should do is familiarise yourself thoroughly with the carb removal and jet kit installation sections on Pat’s site.   Study it carefully and then ask yourself if your technical skills, tools and working environment up to doing this.   Only you can say whether your skills as a practical mechanic are good enough but if you are confident with basic servicing procedures and have the ability to follow instructions carefully, this job will be within your capabilities.  If the thought of adjusting the EXUP valve or changing the plugs fills you with dread, walk away now.

Removing and refitting the carbs is usually what takes the most time and causes most folks the greatest number of problems.  Some of the work on the carbs requires a steady hand and a degree of precision.  You will need patience and you should budget a full day to complete the job without rushing.

You will also need somewhere dry and with good light to see what you are doing around the back of the engine.   A small torch is a must for spotting where some of the fasteners are hidden away. Specialised tools are few and Pat lists all you need on his site.  Make sure you have the 3mm hex driver to reach the No 3 carb inlet stub clamp screw.   A normal allen key will not reach.   I have an old jewellers’ screwdriver with the blade bent at 90 degrees to form a hook tool for removing/refitting  the throttle cables back into place on the cable pulley.   A piece of wire coathanger bent to a hook would be just as good.



Most of the tools you need are probably in your workshop already but there are a couple that you may have to buy.  The first is a pin vice to hold the drill bit is used to open up the pilot circuit bypass holes.  Forget Halfords or the like - try model shops or proper tool and hardware stores.  Do not even think about using any other kind of hand drill, let alone a power tool.  This is no job for a Black & Decker or Dremel.

The next is a Morgan Carbtune II carb balancer.  This will set you back around £55 but it is vital to balance the carbs properly after installing the kit.  You will also need a long No 2 crosshead screwdriver to reach the carb adjustment screws.  Both these items will pay for themselves in short time, as you’ll be able to do all your own routine servicing in the future.

A proper workbench to do the carb mods on is ideal but any flat sturdy surface will do.  I have used kitchen tables, tumbledriers and suchlike - but never when the lady of the house was around.



Preparation



First, get back on Pat’s site and download any of the pictures you think you may need for reference later on.  Make prints of the key illustrations before you start.  My system of working nowadays is a little different to what’s on Pat’s site but the fundamentals are the same.   His skill as a technical photographer far exceeds mine, so there is no point in me duplicating his screenshots.  Suffice to say that the Fazer 1000 (and FZ1) community worldwide owe Pat a big thank you for taking the time to produce such a great technical resource.



Removing the Carbs



Disconnect the battery leads.  Screw the bolts back into the captive nuts before removing the battery to prevent the latter from falling somewhere totally inaccessible.   Remove the battery.

Remove both side panels.  Undo the green connector block behind the left panel.  This is the fuel gauge sender cable connected to the sender unit in the tank.  Use a flat-blade screwdriver to ease the 2 carb bowl overflow hoses off the metal pipes just above the front sprocket cover.  Do not lever against the cover itself as it is only plastic.  If you forget these 2 hoses, you will end up later with the carbs stuck halfway out and no free hands to get at the hoses.



Remove the fuel tank as per Pat’s directions.  Have piece of rag handy to soak up any fuel from the fuel lines when you disconnect them.   It is best to have a part-full tank to avoid leakage from the overflow and breather when the tank is propped up.

Push the fuel hose clips well up the hose to prevent them accidentally being pulled off.  This applies to all the hose clips that you disturb.  Murphy’s Law is sure to guarantee that any clip pulled off a hose will fall into the last place you want it to go. 


Remove the large AIS hose between the airbox and the AIS pump.  Pat describes this as the crankcase breather hose, but this is a labelling error.  Note how the large cable tie fits around the AIS hose and the fuel line.



Remove the 2 carb vent hoses.  Ignore the wire clamps around the top part of the vent hoses.  You do not need to touch the clamps as the hoses simply pull off the plastic connecting T-pieces on the carbs.  The hoses are handed, so mark which is left and right.



Remove the main fuel hose at the back of the carbs. This one will definitely leak some excess fuel, so have the rag handy.  Push the hose back onto the top of the airbox and keep the rag around it.



Separate the TPS connector block as per Pat’s directions.  It may be a little tight so be careful and patient.  Note the fitting of the cable tie to the adjacent coolant overflow hose.


Remove the air box side panels.   Keep two of the screws handy to plug the ends of the carb heater hoses.

The carb heater hoses can be eased off using a flat-blade screwdriver.  Push the clamps well up the hose and plug the ends with the air box side panel screws.   Tuck the hoses over the top of the engine to keep them clear when you remove the carbs.


If the engine was warm when you started work, a small amount of the coolant may come out of the carbs and the hoses.   It is not enough to affect the coolant level but be aware that you might observe it running from under the starter motor next time you use the sidestand. 


Slacken the choke cable clamp and remove the choke cable.  Do not remove the clamp screw completely.  Push the cable over the top of the engine.  Re-tighten the clamp screw to ensure it does not fall out.

Undo the 10mm nut on the throttle opening cable, and the larger 10mm nut on the closing cable assembly.  At the throttle grip end, slacken the opening cable adjuster locknut and wind the adjuster fully in to give maximum cable freeplay.   This makes it easier to remove and refit the cables.



Slacken the 3mm hex bolts on the inlet stub clamps.  Do not remove the bolt completely as you will lose the spacer in the clamp.   To remove the carbs these clamps only need to be loosened to the point where you can just about turn them on the stub.  Any looser and they can get dragged off the stubs as the carbs are extracted.



Slacken the airbox side carb clamps.  Note that they are not screwed completely together on the inlet pipes, just snug enough to prevent leaks, with about 5 - 6mm gap between the ends of the clamps.  Note also the angle of the screws on No 1 & 4 clamps.  They are set in this position to clear the airbox covers.   Remember this for the rebuild.



Important Tip:   Push the airbox clamps as tight back to the airbox as you can get them and then re-tighten the screws.  This will prevent the clamps from being caught up by the carbs as you remove and refit the latter.  The clamps distort easily and although they can be bent back to shape, it is an aggravation you can do without.

Loosen  the 3 x 10mm bolts that hold the airbox in place.  One is partially hidden by the fuel pump.

Important Tip:  Pull the EXUP cables and coolant overflow hose from behind the airbox and push them out clear of the frame rails on the right side.   This is essential to get the maximum clearance to pull back the airbox from the carbs.

Pull the airbox back as far as it will go and then re-tighten the bolt to keep the airbox out of the way.  You should have about 4-5mm clearance now between the carbs and the airbox stubs.  Squirt silicon lube spray around and inside the rubber stubs front and rear of the carbs to help them slide out across the intake stubs.
You should now be ready to remove the carbs.  Double check that everything which should have been loosened or removed has been done.  Put a bowl or several sheets of newspaper on the floor to the left of the bike as the carbs will leak fuel out of the float bowl overflow hoses as they are removed.

Before you remove the carbs, have some clean rags to hand to stuff into the inlet stubs while the carbs are out.

Stand behind the engine on the left side of the bike. Grasp the carbs at each end and pull them back firmly until they clear the inlet stubs. You may need to rock them up and down a little to free them.
Ease the carbs out to the left, watching to ensure that none of the clamps gets pulled off the stubs as you go.  You will need to be quite forceful and the airbox side rubber stubs will impede you as you slide the carbs out. 

When you get the carbs about one quarter of the way across, stop and ease the large electrical connector boot over the top of the throttle cables.  You may find the choke cable mounting plate will try to foul on the No 1 inlet stub but if you rotate the carb bank clockwise it will come clear.
Ivan recommends putting the No 4 carb into the No 1 inlet stub to hold the carbs while removing the throttle cables.  My method is to remove the carbs completely and hold them on my left knee  while removing the cables with my right hand.


Whichever method you choose, remove the closing cable assembly first (the one closest to the front of the bike), then push the opening cable down to get sufficient clearance between the cable and the pulley to fish the cable nipple out of it is housing.   It is tricky to describe and can be just as tricky in practice, but be patient and it will become clear how it should be done.  This is where the hook tool comes into play.  Make a mental note of how the opening cable runs down through the carb bank to the pulley.  This is one of the more difficult jobs in refitting the carbs, so a little time studying now will pay dividends later.

Once the carbs are out and the cables disconnected, put the carb bank somewhere safe and stuff the clean rag into the inlet stubs. 

Before you dismantle the carbs, drain off the fuel in the float bowls.  If you tip the carbs back and forwards, the fuel will come out of the overflow hoses.  It will take several cycles before the hoses run dry.



Installing Ivan’s Jet Kit



Ivan’s kit is an outstandingly well-developed product but the instructions are a little sparse.   Thankfully we have Pat’s site to show us precisely what is entailed when it comes to modding the carbs.



Work on a clean, solid and well-lit work surface and rest the carbs on a large square of clean cloth or a towel.  This prevents little springs and washers from wandering off on their own.  If the carbs are dirty, clean them off with a liberal dosing of WD40, a soft brush and a cloth.  There is no need to be paranoid about this but small specks of dirt in the carbs can cause niggly problems later.



Setting the Mixture Screws



In the UK we do not have to bother with removing the blanking plugs that our US cousins have inflicted on them by their Federal authorities.  Just turn the screws in fully clockwise until they seat lightly.  Back them out 4 ½ to 4 ¾ turns.  Ivan’s instructions say 5 full turns out but I have always used slightly less and have never had a problem reported back to me.



Drilling the Pilot Circuit Bypass Holes



Take the smallest drill supplied in the kit and fit it square and secure in the pin vise with about 12mm of the bit protruding.  Any more and you risk the drill flexing and breaking; too little will prevent you seeing clearly what is happening at the cutting end when the tool is in the carb throat.


This is understandably the part of the job that worries most DIY mechanics but there is nothing to fret about.   Use the throttle cable pulley to open the throttle plates and expose the pilot circuit bypass holes.  Wedge the cable pulley securely to hold the plates open half way.  Make sure that the plates cannot snap closed while you are drilling.

If there is one picture from Pat’s site that you should print for reference, it is the one showing which holes you drill and the one that you leave alone.   It is not possible to drill the holes vertically with a pin vise but that is fine.  Take the angle of cut as it presents itself and start to drill.  Cradle the carb bank against the inside of your  left forearm to keep it at an angle that lets you see what you are doing.   It also makes for a more secure hold/drill position.   Turn the pin vise slowly and apply light pressure only.   You do the turning, let the drill bit do the cutting.  Remove the drill a couple of times to clean off the swarf on the bit and in the carb throat.

Important Tip:  Pat’s site he shows the pin vise angled in from the 2 o’clock position but the correct alignment is straight down from the 12 o’clock position.   Pat’s picture is posed to illustrate the limited access and he offset the tool for clarity.



Important Tip:  The holes to be enlarged are less than 1mm deep.  You will feel the drill bit tighten in the hole as it approaches break-through.  Be careful now as the twisting force on the drill is at it is greatest.   Be extra cautious if it is cold in your workplace, as the drill will be brittle at lower temperatures.   You will feel the bit drop through the hole by about 1mm once the hole is opened out and clean. 



Rotate the drill a few more turns until the hole is properly cleaned out and the drill bit will retract easily with a little rearward pull.  Do not over-enlarge the hole, though.

Be precise and patient with this part of the installation and will be fine.  For what it is worth, I have had 3 drills break on me in more than 500 installations.  One was clumsiness on my part; one I put down to a brittle drill on a very cold day and I suspect the third was down to a manufacturing weakness in the drill itself.  All 3 snapped off leaving plenty for me to grasp with needle nose pliers, and all came out without damaging the carbs in anyway. 



Adjusting the Float Levels



Remove all 4 float bowls together as as you need to check that all 4 floats are at the same height. The screws are good quality stainless steel, but make sure the screwdriver is a good fit.  If the screws are tight, you may have a little corrosion in the threads.   Seat the screwdriver in the screw and tap the handle a few times with a hammer to break the corrosion.   A couple of the screws sit underneath the spring clamps on the carb heater hoses.  Do not disturb the clamps, just use a pair of needle nose pliers to lift the screws out, then wriggle the float bowls clear.  Remove the idle adjuster holding screw from the middle of the No 1 float bowl.  Lay the float covers out so that you can refit them to the same carb later.


Pat’s site shows you clearly how and where to measure the float heights but gauging when the float is at the correct position for measuring is not so obvious from his pictures.
Fortunately there is  a very reliable way of checking that you are doing it right.


First, take the carb bank in your left hand and place one end on the workbench with the open float chambers to the right, so that you can get at them with your right hand.  Obviously you reverse these directions if you are a lefty.

Rotate the carb bank clockwise and watch as the floats fall away from the carb bodies.  Once they have stopped moving, rotate the carbs back slowly in the opposite direction.  Watch the floats carefully and you will see them stop as they just make contact with the float needles.  THIS IS THE POINT WHERE YOU MEASURE THE FLOAT HEIGHT.  If you continue to rotate the carbs anti-clockwise, the floats will eventually move again as they overcome the float needle spring pressure.

Repeat this drill several times until you are confident that you have got the right point of measurement. 

Important Tip:  Here is the most reliable way of confirming that have found the right position to measure and adjust the float heights.  Measure the standard float height before making any adjustments.  I promise you it will be 12.5mm.  Guaranteed.  If you get a reading any different, you are not measuring it correctly.  Out of more than 2000 floats I have checked, only one was out of adjustment and that by an insignificant 0.5mm. 


Once you have established the datum for adjusting the float heights, you need to bend the float tangs down by about 0.5 - 0.75mm to increase the float height to the recommended 14mm.   The actual outcome of increasing the measured float height is to reduce the fuel level in the chamber.



Important Tip:  If you need to bend the tangs more than the amount above to get a 14mm float height, you are probably taking your measurements incorrectly.

If you sight along the line of all 4 floats, you should see them lined up at the same height.  Use the moulded ridge around the edge of the floats as reference for this and it is obvious when there is any deviation between adjacent floats.  Keep making small adjustments until you have all 4 floats at the same height, between 13.5 - 14mm.



Changing the Main Jets



Remove the OE main jets and replace with Ivan’s mains.  Use a screwdriver that fit is the main jet slot correctly.   Remember that you are tightening brass components so do not be heavy-handed.  You will need a spanner on the holder to stop it unscrewing from the carb body as you remove the OE mains. 

Give the float heights one final check and replace the float bowls.  No need for gasket sealant, just tighten the screws and replace the idle adjuster cable.



Needles and Springs and Things



Remove all 4 of the carb tops.  Watch out for the spacers under the TPS cable holder screw and the choke mounting screw.  Lay the carb tops out in sequence for refitting to the correct carb later. Check to see whether the small O-ring has remained on the carb body or is stuck to the carb top.  Put it safe for refitting.



Extract the springs and the slides.  Remove the needle assemblies from each of the slides.  See Pat’s site for illustrations.  Use a pair of needle nose pliers to grip the needle holder.  Watch out for the needle springs as you extract the needle assemblies.



Lay out each set of components neatly corresponding to the carb they came from.  Using the medium sized drill in the jet kit, enlarge the air bypass holes in the throttle slides.  Note that only a very small amount of swarf comes out as this is only a minor enlargement.  Do not drill out the hole that the needle fit is through.



Replace the OE needles with Ivan’s using Pat’s site for reference, noting that on pre-2003 bikes you omit one of the OE shims on each needle.



From 2003 onwards, Yamaha changed the size of the nylon spacers on the needles.  Pre-2003 models have 2.5mm spacers on all needles.  Early 2003 models have 2 x 2.5mm and 2 x 3.0mm spacers.   From late 2003 onwards all 4 needles have 3.0mm spacers.



The procedure for getting the correct installed needle height with 3mm spacers is simple.  Move the e-clip on Ivan’s needles from the 3rd groove to the 2nd groove from the top. Put the nylon spacer under the e-clip, then one of the OE metal shims under the nylon spacer.



Follow Pat’s directions for refitting the needle assemblies.  Use the needle nose pliers to insert them back into the housing, being careful to ensure that they fit squarely in the slide. It will be obvious if the needle holder is off centre in the housing.  If it is, remove it and try again.  Note that there are splines on the needle holders that correspond to cut-outs where they fit in the slide body.  Push the needle up to check that the spring is correctly seated.   It should move about 2mm or so.



Once all 4 slides have been drilled and the needles changed, refit the slides to the carbs and set aside while you clip the slide springs.



Ivan says it is OK to shorten the springs by as much as ¾” but I never cut more than ½” off.  I prefer to err on the slightly long side, rather than end up with a spring that is too short.  If the spring is too short, the slides may flutter in the carbs causing inconsistent fuelling.



Whatever method of measuring you choose, be sure to get the springs the same length as each other.  Place them alongside each other on a flat surface to check this.


Once you have cut the springs, refit them to the carbs and replace the carb tops.  Seat the carb diaphragms correctly in their grooves and do not pinch them when refitting the carb tops.  Do not forget the little O-rings either, and remember the 2 spacers for the TPS and choke mounting screws.



When the carbs are back together, push each slide up inside the carb throat using your fingers.  Check that it moves all the way to fully open and does not bind at any point. You should note the same resistance and each slide should return at the same rate.  If it does not, you have probably got a spring binding or a pinched diaphragm.



Reinstalling the Carbs



Refitting is the reverse of the dismantling process.  Well, thats what the Haynes or Clymer manuals usually say.   For the most part, it is true but there are still a few procedures to come which may test your patience.



Before you refit the carbs, remove the caps and the AIS vacuum hose from the inlet stub vacuum pipes and connect the hose for your carb balancer to inlet stub No 3 while you have perfect access.   Squirt silicon lube inside the inlet stubs and the airbox rubbers.

If you chose to remove the throttle cables with the carbs completely out to the side of the motor, now is the time to refit them in the same location.
If you followed Ivan’s procedure for cable removal, feed the carbs back in to the motor from the left, pausing to put the No 4 carb in the No 1 inlet stub while you refit the throttle cables.
Whichever method you follow, fit the opening cable first.  Get as much cable inner slack as you can and feed it down through the carb bank following the route it came out.   Have the hook tool handy in case you need to fish the cable nipple through to the pulley.  Tighten the lock nut with your fingers to hold the opening cable in the mounting plate.  Then refit the closing cable to the front of the carbs.



Ease the carbs back and wriggle them across to the right. You will need to pause about midway again to move the electrical connector boot back over the throttle cables.  Do not forget this or you will have to remove the left hand coil to do it later.


Be positive and keep the front of the carbs clear of the inlet stubs.  The airbox rubbers will flex and give way as you push the carbs across.   Push firmly but pause if you feel anything is snagging.


Line up the carbs with the inlet stubs and get them square to the opening.  It takes a firm push to seat the carbs fully in the inlet stubs.   There is a ridge around the carb stubs which engages with a groove in the inlet stubs.  It is obvious when then slot home fully.   You may need a few tries to get the carbs properly reseated in the stubs but it is important to get this right as an air leak will cause poor running.



Tighten the 3mm hex clamp screws on the inlet stubs.   Do not overtighten or you will crush the spacers.



Loosen the airbox top bolt and line up the airbox stubs with the carbs.   Run your fingers around the stubs to free any snagged edges.  Once everything is aligned correctly, the airbox will slide forward and the stubs will slip cleanly over the carbs.  Tighten the 3 airbox bolts and refit the fuel pump on it is bracket.



Slacken the airbox stub clamps and push them forward on the stubs.  The inner 2 stub rubbers have alignment ridges on the top which correspond to small U-shaped bends in the top of the clamps. Remember the correct position of the clamps on the 2 outer carbs.  Make sure that the clamps are properly seated on the underside of the stubs.

Refit the carb heater hoses.  The left hand one can be done easily with your fingers but the right hand one is harder to get at. You may need bent-nosed pliers to get the small clamp back in place.


Connect up the float bowl drain hoses to the metal pipes over the front sprocket cover.



Throttle and Choke Cable Replacement/Adjustment



Tighten the throttle cable adjuster nuts, starting with the closing cable (non-adjustable) and then the opening cable.  Adjust the throttle cable freeplay using the adjuster at the throttle grip end.  Snap the throttle open several times to ensure that they are not binding.

Slacken the choke cable clamp bolt, slide the cable end into place after connecting the nipple to the actuator rod.  Tighten the clamp bolt.



Connect up the fuel line to the carbs from the fuel pump.

Refit the battery.


Check the TPS setting following the instructions on Pat’s site. 


Check and adjust the EXUP cables following the instructions on Pat’s site.

Be sure to use plenty of copper grease on the EXUP cover bolts when you refit them.
Re-route the EXUP cables and the coolant overflow hose behind the airbox.



Connect up the remaining three carb balancer gauge hoses to the inlet stub vacuum pipes.



Replace the fuel tank following Pat’s instructions.  Connect the fuel line and turn on the fuel tap.

Do not connect the overflow pipes yet or replace any of the other AIS and float bowl vacuum pipes. The latter obstruct access to the carb adjustment screws.  



Before you attempt to start the motor, check all the fasteners and hoses front to rear one more time.   When you are content that all is correct, ignition on, full choke and wait for the fuel pump to stop clicking.  Thumb the starter and the motor should start promptly.  Be ready to reduce the choke and let the bike settle to an easy idle at around 1500rpm.

Let the engine warm fully and then drop the idle to around 1,000 rpm for the carb balance.  Follow the instructions on Pat’s site for this.  



Tiny adjustments with the screwdriver make a noticeable change in gauge readings.  You may also find that alterations to one pair of carbs will slightly affect the readings on the other pair.  Be patient and work your way steadily to an even reading across the gauges.  The actual vacuum reading is not critical.

When the carbs are properly balanced, set the idle speed to 1250 – 1300rpm.
Check that the carbs remain in synch.  Fine tune again if necessary.



Remove the gauge hoses and refit the vacuum pipe caps and the AIS vacuum hose.  No 3 is a bit tricky to reach, especially when the engine is hot.   A tip is to hold the cap over the stub with a magnetic pick-up tool and press it down into place with a flat-blade screwdriver.   



Replace all the hoses and cable ties and lower the fuel tank.  Use threadlock on the front tank bolt on pre-03 model bikes.  Later model bikes have the larger flanged tank bolt which does not vibrate loose like it is predecessor.



Reconnect the green fuel sender connector under the left hand side panel.  Replace all the side panels



Congratulations!

You have now joined the ranks of the Ivanised.  You should find that the motor now starts easier, pulls stronger from small throttle openings, picks up quicker and generally feels fitter in all respects.  You have also learned a lot about the innards and workings of the carbs and the layout of the Fazer engine.  



Enjoy your new Fazer and keep it shiny side up, alright?




Cheers,


Mike
« Last Edit: 02 January 2011, 08:16:55 PM by Aegis Bearing Mel »

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Re: Ivan's Jet Kit Installation Guide by Mike the Falcon
« Reply #1 on: 30 June 2013, 06:34:47 PM »
hi i am sorry to bother you could you tell me please how much it would cost to have the ivan jet kit fitted to the bike ?
thank you john
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Re: Ivan's Jet Kit Installation Guide by Mike the Falcon
« Reply #2 on: 25 August 2013, 09:19:11 PM »
Mike are you still carrying out this upgrade
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Ivan's Jet Kit Installation Guide by Mike the Falcon
« Reply #3 on: 26 August 2013, 09:21:13 AM »
Introduction



I have fitted Ivan’s jet kits is to several hundred Fazer 1000s and in the process picked up a few tricks to make the job a little easier and quicker.
Like the saying goes, experience is what you get just after you needed it.   

What follows is a step-by-step description of the process which should be read in conjunction with the illustrated guides on Pat Glenn’s excellent site.
Please note that the text accompanying my part of the installation guide there was written in 2004.  What you are about to read is an updated version which takes account of the things I have learned since then.

This guide covers the fitting of Ivan’s Slip-On jet kit which works well with either the standard end can or an aftermarket can. 
For those requiring more peak power there are further mods to the airbox lid and the carb inlet stubs which offer an extra 5- 8bhp above 8,000 rpm. These mods require Ivan’s MB jet kit, a K&N type air filter and a less restrictive aftermarket can.

If you are thinking about fitting Ivan’s kit yourself, the first thing you should do is familiarise yourself thoroughly with the carb removal and jet kit installation sections on Pat’s site.   Study it carefully and then ask yourself if your technical skills, tools and working environment up to doing this.   Only you can say whether your skills as a practical mechanic are good enough but if you are confident with basic servicing procedures and have the ability to follow instructions carefully, this job will be within your capabilities.  If the thought of adjusting the EXUP valve or changing the plugs fills you with dread, walk away now.

Removing and refitting the carbs is usually what takes the most time and causes most folks the greatest number of problems.  Some of the work on the carbs requires a steady hand and a degree of precision.  You will need patience and you should budget a full day to complete the job without rushing.

You will also need somewhere dry and with good light to see what you are doing around the back of the engine.   A small torch is a must for spotting where some of the fasteners are hidden away. Specialised tools are few and Pat lists all you need on his site.  Make sure you have the 3mm hex driver to reach the No 3 carb inlet stub clamp screw.   A normal allen key will not reach.   I have an old jewellers’ screwdriver with the blade bent at 90 degrees to form a hook tool for removing/refitting  the throttle cables back into place on the cable pulley.   A piece of wire coathanger bent to a hook would be just as good.



Most of the tools you need are probably in your workshop already but there are a couple that you may have to buy.  The first is a pin vice to hold the drill bit is used to open up the pilot circuit bypass holes.  Forget Halfords or the like - try model shops or proper tool and hardware stores.  Do not even think about using any other kind of hand drill, let alone a power tool.  This is no job for a Black & Decker or Dremel.

The next is a Morgan Carbtune II carb balancer.  This will set you back around £55 but it is vital to balance the carbs properly after installing the kit.  You will also need a long No 2 crosshead screwdriver to reach the carb adjustment screws.  Both these items will pay for themselves in short time, as you’ll be able to do all your own routine servicing in the future.

A proper workbench to do the carb mods on is ideal but any flat sturdy surface will do.  I have used kitchen tables, tumbledriers and suchlike - but never when the lady of the house was around.



Preparation



First, get back on Pat’s site and download any of the pictures you think you may need for reference later on.  Make prints of the key illustrations before you start.  My system of working nowadays is a little different to what’s on Pat’s site but the fundamentals are the same.   His skill as a technical photographer far exceeds mine, so there is no point in me duplicating his screenshots.  Suffice to say that the Fazer 1000 (and FZ1) community worldwide owe Pat a big thank you for taking the time to produce such a great technical resource.



Removing the Carbs



Disconnect the battery leads.  Screw the bolts back into the captive nuts before removing the battery to prevent the latter from falling somewhere totally inaccessible.   Remove the battery.

Remove both side panels.  Undo the green connector block behind the left panel.  This is the fuel gauge sender cable connected to the sender unit in the tank.  Use a flat-blade screwdriver to ease the 2 carb bowl overflow hoses off the metal pipes just above the front sprocket cover.  Do not lever against the cover itself as it is only plastic.  If you forget these 2 hoses, you will end up later with the carbs stuck halfway out and no free hands to get at the hoses.



Remove the fuel tank as per Pat’s directions.  Have piece of rag handy to soak up any fuel from the fuel lines when you disconnect them.   It is best to have a part-full tank to avoid leakage from the overflow and breather when the tank is propped up.

Push the fuel hose clips well up the hose to prevent them accidentally being pulled off.  This applies to all the hose clips that you disturb.  Murphy’s Law is sure to guarantee that any clip pulled off a hose will fall into the last place you want it to go. 


Remove the large AIS hose between the airbox and the AIS pump.  Pat describes this as the crankcase breather hose, but this is a labelling error.  Note how the large cable tie fits around the AIS hose and the fuel line.



Remove the 2 carb vent hoses.  Ignore the wire clamps around the top part of the vent hoses.  You do not need to touch the clamps as the hoses simply pull off the plastic connecting T-pieces on the carbs.  The hoses are handed, so mark which is left and right.



Remove the main fuel hose at the back of the carbs. This one will definitely leak some excess fuel, so have the rag handy.  Push the hose back onto the top of the airbox and keep the rag around it.



Separate the TPS connector block as per Pat’s directions.  It may be a little tight so be careful and patient.  Note the fitting of the cable tie to the adjacent coolant overflow hose.


Remove the air box side panels.   Keep two of the screws handy to plug the ends of the carb heater hoses.

The carb heater hoses can be eased off using a flat-blade screwdriver.  Push the clamps well up the hose and plug the ends with the air box side panel screws.   Tuck the hoses over the top of the engine to keep them clear when you remove the carbs.


If the engine was warm when you started work, a small amount of the coolant may come out of the carbs and the hoses.   It is not enough to affect the coolant level but be aware that you might observe it running from under the starter motor next time you use the sidestand. 


Slacken the choke cable clamp and remove the choke cable.  Do not remove the clamp screw completely.  Push the cable over the top of the engine.  Re-tighten the clamp screw to ensure it does not fall out.

Undo the 10mm nut on the throttle opening cable, and the larger 10mm nut on the closing cable assembly.  At the throttle grip end, slacken the opening cable adjuster locknut and wind the adjuster fully in to give maximum cable freeplay.   This makes it easier to remove and refit the cables.



Slacken the 3mm hex bolts on the inlet stub clamps.  Do not remove the bolt completely as you will lose the spacer in the clamp.   To remove the carbs these clamps only need to be loosened to the point where you can just about turn them on the stub.  Any looser and they can get dragged off the stubs as the carbs are extracted.



Slacken the airbox side carb clamps.  Note that they are not screwed completely together on the inlet pipes, just snug enough to prevent leaks, with about 5 - 6mm gap between the ends of the clamps.  Note also the angle of the screws on No 1 & 4 clamps.  They are set in this position to clear the airbox covers.   Remember this for the rebuild.



Important Tip:   Push the airbox clamps as tight back to the airbox as you can get them and then re-tighten the screws.  This will prevent the clamps from being caught up by the carbs as you remove and refit the latter.  The clamps distort easily and although they can be bent back to shape, it is an aggravation you can do without.

Loosen  the 3 x 10mm bolts that hold the airbox in place.  One is partially hidden by the fuel pump.

Important Tip:  Pull the EXUP cables and coolant overflow hose from behind the airbox and push them out clear of the frame rails on the right side.   This is essential to get the maximum clearance to pull back the airbox from the carbs.

Pull the airbox back as far as it will go and then re-tighten the bolt to keep the airbox out of the way.  You should have about 4-5mm clearance now between the carbs and the airbox stubs.  Squirt silicon lube spray around and inside the rubber stubs front and rear of the carbs to help them slide out across the intake stubs.
You should now be ready to remove the carbs.  Double check that everything which should have been loosened or removed has been done.  Put a bowl or several sheets of newspaper on the floor to the left of the bike as the carbs will leak fuel out of the float bowl overflow hoses as they are removed.

Before you remove the carbs, have some clean rags to hand to stuff into the inlet stubs while the carbs are out.

Stand behind the engine on the left side of the bike. Grasp the carbs at each end and pull them back firmly until they clear the inlet stubs. You may need to rock them up and down a little to free them.
Ease the carbs out to the left, watching to ensure that none of the clamps gets pulled off the stubs as you go.  You will need to be quite forceful and the airbox side rubber stubs will impede you as you slide the carbs out. 

When you get the carbs about one quarter of the way across, stop and ease the large electrical connector boot over the top of the throttle cables.  You may find the choke cable mounting plate will try to foul on the No 1 inlet stub but if you rotate the carb bank clockwise it will come clear.
Ivan recommends putting the No 4 carb into the No 1 inlet stub to hold the carbs while removing the throttle cables.  My method is to remove the carbs completely and hold them on my left knee  while removing the cables with my right hand.


Whichever method you choose, remove the closing cable assembly first (the one closest to the front of the bike), then push the opening cable down to get sufficient clearance between the cable and the pulley to fish the cable nipple out of it is housing.   It is tricky to describe and can be just as tricky in practice, but be patient and it will become clear how it should be done.  This is where the hook tool comes into play.  Make a mental note of how the opening cable runs down through the carb bank to the pulley.  This is one of the more difficult jobs in refitting the carbs, so a little time studying now will pay dividends later.

Once the carbs are out and the cables disconnected, put the carb bank somewhere safe and stuff the clean rag into the inlet stubs. 

Before you dismantle the carbs, drain off the fuel in the float bowls.  If you tip the carbs back and forwards, the fuel will come out of the overflow hoses.  It will take several cycles before the hoses run dry.



Installing Ivan’s Jet Kit



Ivan’s kit is an outstandingly well-developed product but the instructions are a little sparse.   Thankfully we have Pat’s site to show us precisely what is entailed when it comes to modding the carbs.



Work on a clean, solid and well-lit work surface and rest the carbs on a large square of clean cloth or a towel.  This prevents little springs and washers from wandering off on their own.  If the carbs are dirty, clean them off with a liberal dosing of WD40, a soft brush and a cloth.  There is no need to be paranoid about this but small specks of dirt in the carbs can cause niggly problems later.



Setting the Mixture Screws



In the UK we do not have to bother with removing the blanking plugs that our US cousins have inflicted on them by their Federal authorities.  Just turn the screws in fully clockwise until they seat lightly.  Back them out 4 ½ to 4 ¾ turns.  Ivan’s instructions say 5 full turns out but I have always used slightly less and have never had a problem reported back to me.



Drilling the Pilot Circuit Bypass Holes



Take the smallest drill supplied in the kit and fit it square and secure in the pin vise with about 12mm of the bit protruding.  Any more and you risk the drill flexing and breaking; too little will prevent you seeing clearly what is happening at the cutting end when the tool is in the carb throat.


This is understandably the part of the job that worries most DIY mechanics but there is nothing to fret about.   Use the throttle cable pulley to open the throttle plates and expose the pilot circuit bypass holes.  Wedge the cable pulley securely to hold the plates open half way.  Make sure that the plates cannot snap closed while you are drilling.

If there is one picture from Pat’s site that you should print for reference, it is the one showing which holes you drill and the one that you leave alone.   It is not possible to drill the holes vertically with a pin vise but that is fine.  Take the angle of cut as it presents itself and start to drill.  Cradle the carb bank against the inside of your  left forearm to keep it at an angle that lets you see what you are doing.   It also makes for a more secure hold/drill position.   Turn the pin vise slowly and apply light pressure only.   You do the turning, let the drill bit do the cutting.  Remove the drill a couple of times to clean off the swarf on the bit and in the carb throat.

Important Tip:  Pat’s site he shows the pin vise angled in from the 2 o’clock position but the correct alignment is straight down from the 12 o’clock position.   Pat’s picture is posed to illustrate the limited access and he offset the tool for clarity.



Important Tip:  The holes to be enlarged are less than 1mm deep.  You will feel the drill bit tighten in the hole as it approaches break-through.  Be careful now as the twisting force on the drill is at it is greatest.   Be extra cautious if it is cold in your workplace, as the drill will be brittle at lower temperatures.   You will feel the bit drop through the hole by about 1mm once the hole is opened out and clean. 



Rotate the drill a few more turns until the hole is properly cleaned out and the drill bit will retract easily with a little rearward pull.  Do not over-enlarge the hole, though.

Be precise and patient with this part of the installation and will be fine.  For what it is worth, I have had 3 drills break on me in more than 500 installations.  One was clumsiness on my part; one I put down to a brittle drill on a very cold day and I suspect the third was down to a manufacturing weakness in the drill itself.  All 3 snapped off leaving plenty for me to grasp with needle nose pliers, and all came out without damaging the carbs in anyway. 



Adjusting the Float Levels



Remove all 4 float bowls together as as you need to check that all 4 floats are at the same height. The screws are good quality stainless steel, but make sure the screwdriver is a good fit.  If the screws are tight, you may have a little corrosion in the threads.   Seat the screwdriver in the screw and tap the handle a few times with a hammer to break the corrosion.   A couple of the screws sit underneath the spring clamps on the carb heater hoses.  Do not disturb the clamps, just use a pair of needle nose pliers to lift the screws out, then wriggle the float bowls clear.  Remove the idle adjuster holding screw from the middle of the No 1 float bowl.  Lay the float covers out so that you can refit them to the same carb later.


Pat’s site shows you clearly how and where to measure the float heights but gauging when the float is at the correct position for measuring is not so obvious from his pictures.
Fortunately there is  a very reliable way of checking that you are doing it right.


First, take the carb bank in your left hand and place one end on the workbench with the open float chambers to the right, so that you can get at them with your right hand.  Obviously you reverse these directions if you are a lefty.

Rotate the carb bank clockwise and watch as the floats fall away from the carb bodies.  Once they have stopped moving, rotate the carbs back slowly in the opposite direction.  Watch the floats carefully and you will see them stop as they just make contact with the float needles.  THIS IS THE POINT WHERE YOU MEASURE THE FLOAT HEIGHT.  If you continue to rotate the carbs anti-clockwise, the floats will eventually move again as they overcome the float needle spring pressure.

Repeat this drill several times until you are confident that you have got the right point of measurement. 

Important Tip:  Here is the most reliable way of confirming that have found the right position to measure and adjust the float heights.  Measure the standard float height before making any adjustments.  I promise you it will be 12.5mm.  Guaranteed.  If you get a reading any different, you are not measuring it correctly.  Out of more than 2000 floats I have checked, only one was out of adjustment and that by an insignificant 0.5mm. 


Once you have established the datum for adjusting the float heights, you need to bend the float tangs down by about 0.5 - 0.75mm to increase the float height to the recommended 14mm.   The actual outcome of increasing the measured float height is to reduce the fuel level in the chamber.



Important Tip:  If you need to bend the tangs more than the amount above to get a 14mm float height, you are probably taking your measurements incorrectly.

If you sight along the line of all 4 floats, you should see them lined up at the same height.  Use the moulded ridge around the edge of the floats as reference for this and it is obvious when there is any deviation between adjacent floats.  Keep making small adjustments until you have all 4 floats at the same height, between 13.5 - 14mm.



Changing the Main Jets



Remove the OE main jets and replace with Ivan’s mains.  Use a screwdriver that fit is the main jet slot correctly.   Remember that you are tightening brass components so do not be heavy-handed.  You will need a spanner on the holder to stop it unscrewing from the carb body as you remove the OE mains. 

Give the float heights one final check and replace the float bowls.  No need for gasket sealant, just tighten the screws and replace the idle adjuster cable.



Needles and Springs and Things



Remove all 4 of the carb tops.  Watch out for the spacers under the TPS cable holder screw and the choke mounting screw.  Lay the carb tops out in sequence for refitting to the correct carb later. Check to see whether the small O-ring has remained on the carb body or is stuck to the carb top.  Put it safe for refitting.



Extract the springs and the slides.  Remove the needle assemblies from each of the slides.  See Pat’s site for illustrations.  Use a pair of needle nose pliers to grip the needle holder.  Watch out for the needle springs as you extract the needle assemblies.



Lay out each set of components neatly corresponding to the carb they came from.  Using the medium sized drill in the jet kit, enlarge the air bypass holes in the throttle slides.  Note that only a very small amount of swarf comes out as this is only a minor enlargement.  Do not drill out the hole that the needle fit is through.



Replace the OE needles with Ivan’s using Pat’s site for reference, noting that on pre-2003 bikes you omit one of the OE shims on each needle.



From 2003 onwards, Yamaha changed the size of the nylon spacers on the needles.  Pre-2003 models have 2.5mm spacers on all needles.  Early 2003 models have 2 x 2.5mm and 2 x 3.0mm spacers.   From late 2003 onwards all 4 needles have 3.0mm spacers.



The procedure for getting the correct installed needle height with 3mm spacers is simple.  Move the e-clip on Ivan’s needles from the 3rd groove to the 2nd groove from the top. Put the nylon spacer under the e-clip, then one of the OE metal shims under the nylon spacer.



Follow Pat’s directions for refitting the needle assemblies.  Use the needle nose pliers to insert them back into the housing, being careful to ensure that they fit squarely in the slide. It will be obvious if the needle holder is off centre in the housing.  If it is, remove it and try again.  Note that there are splines on the needle holders that correspond to cut-outs where they fit in the slide body.  Push the needle up to check that the spring is correctly seated.   It should move about 2mm or so.



Once all 4 slides have been drilled and the needles changed, refit the slides to the carbs and set aside while you clip the slide springs.



Ivan says it is OK to shorten the springs by as much as ¾” but I never cut more than ½” off.  I prefer to err on the slightly long side, rather than end up with a spring that is too short.  If the spring is too short, the slides may flutter in the carbs causing inconsistent fuelling.



Whatever method of measuring you choose, be sure to get the springs the same length as each other.  Place them alongside each other on a flat surface to check this.


Once you have cut the springs, refit them to the carbs and replace the carb tops.  Seat the carb diaphragms correctly in their grooves and do not pinch them when refitting the carb tops.  Do not forget the little O-rings either, and remember the 2 spacers for the TPS and choke mounting screws.



When the carbs are back together, push each slide up inside the carb throat using your fingers.  Check that it moves all the way to fully open and does not bind at any point. You should note the same resistance and each slide should return at the same rate.  If it does not, you have probably got a spring binding or a pinched diaphragm.



Reinstalling the Carbs



Refitting is the reverse of the dismantling process.  Well, thats what the Haynes or Clymer manuals usually say.   For the most part, it is true but there are still a few procedures to come which may test your patience.



Before you refit the carbs, remove the caps and the AIS vacuum hose from the inlet stub vacuum pipes and connect the hose for your carb balancer to inlet stub No 3 while you have perfect access.   Squirt silicon lube inside the inlet stubs and the airbox rubbers.

If you chose to remove the throttle cables with the carbs completely out to the side of the motor, now is the time to refit them in the same location.
If you followed Ivan’s procedure for cable removal, feed the carbs back in to the motor from the left, pausing to put the No 4 carb in the No 1 inlet stub while you refit the throttle cables.
Whichever method you follow, fit the opening cable first.  Get as much cable inner slack as you can and feed it down through the carb bank following the route it came out.   Have the hook tool handy in case you need to fish the cable nipple through to the pulley.  Tighten the lock nut with your fingers to hold the opening cable in the mounting plate.  Then refit the closing cable to the front of the carbs.



Ease the carbs back and wriggle them across to the right. You will need to pause about midway again to move the electrical connector boot back over the throttle cables.  Do not forget this or you will have to remove the left hand coil to do it later.


Be positive and keep the front of the carbs clear of the inlet stubs.  The airbox rubbers will flex and give way as you push the carbs across.   Push firmly but pause if you feel anything is snagging.


Line up the carbs with the inlet stubs and get them square to the opening.  It takes a firm push to seat the carbs fully in the inlet stubs.   There is a ridge around the carb stubs which engages with a groove in the inlet stubs.  It is obvious when then slot home fully.   You may need a few tries to get the carbs properly reseated in the stubs but it is important to get this right as an air leak will cause poor running.



Tighten the 3mm hex clamp screws on the inlet stubs.   Do not overtighten or you will crush the spacers.



Loosen the airbox top bolt and line up the airbox stubs with the carbs.   Run your fingers around the stubs to free any snagged edges.  Once everything is aligned correctly, the airbox will slide forward and the stubs will slip cleanly over the carbs.  Tighten the 3 airbox bolts and refit the fuel pump on it is bracket.



Slacken the airbox stub clamps and push them forward on the stubs.  The inner 2 stub rubbers have alignment ridges on the top which correspond to small U-shaped bends in the top of the clamps. Remember the correct position of the clamps on the 2 outer carbs.  Make sure that the clamps are properly seated on the underside of the stubs.

Refit the carb heater hoses.  The left hand one can be done easily with your fingers but the right hand one is harder to get at. You may need bent-nosed pliers to get the small clamp back in place.


Connect up the float bowl drain hoses to the metal pipes over the front sprocket cover.



Throttle and Choke Cable Replacement/Adjustment



Tighten the throttle cable adjuster nuts, starting with the closing cable (non-adjustable) and then the opening cable.  Adjust the throttle cable freeplay using the adjuster at the throttle grip end.  Snap the throttle open several times to ensure that they are not binding.

Slacken the choke cable clamp bolt, slide the cable end into place after connecting the nipple to the actuator rod.  Tighten the clamp bolt.



Connect up the fuel line to the carbs from the fuel pump.

Refit the battery.


Check the TPS setting following the instructions on Pat’s site. 


Check and adjust the EXUP cables following the instructions on Pat’s site.

Be sure to use plenty of copper grease on the EXUP cover bolts when you refit them.
Re-route the EXUP cables and the coolant overflow hose behind the airbox.



Connect up the remaining three carb balancer gauge hoses to the inlet stub vacuum pipes.



Replace the fuel tank following Pat’s instructions.  Connect the fuel line and turn on the fuel tap.

Do not connect the overflow pipes yet or replace any of the other AIS and float bowl vacuum pipes. The latter obstruct access to the carb adjustment screws.  



Before you attempt to start the motor, check all the fasteners and hoses front to rear one more time.   When you are content that all is correct, ignition on, full choke and wait for the fuel pump to stop clicking.  Thumb the starter and the motor should start promptly.  Be ready to reduce the choke and let the bike settle to an easy idle at around 1500rpm.

Let the engine warm fully and then drop the idle to around 1,000 rpm for the carb balance.  Follow the instructions on Pat’s site for this.  



Tiny adjustments with the screwdriver make a noticeable change in gauge readings.  You may also find that alterations to one pair of carbs will slightly affect the readings on the other pair.  Be patient and work your way steadily to an even reading across the gauges.  The actual vacuum reading is not critical.

When the carbs are properly balanced, set the idle speed to 1250 – 1300rpm.
Check that the carbs remain in synch.  Fine tune again if necessary.



Remove the gauge hoses and refit the vacuum pipe caps and the AIS vacuum hose.  No 3 is a bit tricky to reach, especially when the engine is hot.   A tip is to hold the cap over the stub with a magnetic pick-up tool and press it down into place with a flat-blade screwdriver.   



Replace all the hoses and cable ties and lower the fuel tank.  Use threadlock on the front tank bolt on pre-03 model bikes.  Later model bikes have the larger flanged tank bolt which does not vibrate loose like it is predecessor.



Reconnect the green fuel sender connector under the left hand side panel.  Replace all the side panels



Congratulations!

You have now joined the ranks of the Ivanised.  You should find that the motor now starts easier, pulls stronger from small throttle openings, picks up quicker and generally feels fitter in all respects.  You have also learned a lot about the innards and workings of the carbs and the layout of the Fazer engine.  



Enjoy your new Fazer and keep it shiny side up, alright?




Cheers,


Mike


Bloody ell aegis that was a post and a half.....reminds me of horse and water.... or errrr......cheese and cracker.....or..... I got it.....Ivan or ivan not.....Hehehe..... (When ur bike is bluu) ahem.
« Last Edit: 26 August 2013, 09:26:20 AM by Exupnut »
Just flapping about on this stagnant little pond on the outer rim of the internet.....yup....  :-))