Date: 22-04-19  Time: 21:02 PM

Author Topic: Fitting Spotlights  (Read 848 times)

redmandan

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Re: Fitting Spotlights
« Reply #25 on: 11 February 2019, 01:45:05 PM »
That was me that asked about the spot mounting poles! Thanks Tommy. I thought it was something you made yourself but wanted to know if I could buy them somewhere.

I’ll probably try and replicate your setup. I guess I might have to tap the hole on the bike frame if it’s not already threaded (that’s ok I have tools to do that). When I find a suitable pole though I’m not sure how I will put a thread onto that.

Middy2000

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Re: Fitting Spotlights
« Reply #26 on: 11 February 2019, 04:33:49 PM »
The one wire I cut into was soldered. and then wrapped in heat shrink. 


All other connections were made using insulated bullet connectors which were then wrapped in heat shrink.  I then wrapped the lot in electrical tape so there are no connectors exposed.  It'll be a nightmare to unpick should anything fail.


As for the issue of potential damage with the spots mounted on the rad.......I've no immediate plans to lay my bike down on it's side.  Fingers crossed.


Having recently undertaken the fitting of both spotlights and heated grips I'm now in the position of being able to impart my knowledge if anybody else is seeking guidance.


For info the grips I used were the cheap Chinese type from Ebay.  I did so on the recommendation of a work colleague who rated them. 
Tell you what....they're pretty good, had to turn them down after 5 mins this morning.  They were only a tenner.  Only issue is that it's a throttle tube and grip in one and for some reason the collar for holding the cables was about 1mm too thick so when clamped down the throttle wouldn't release smoothly.  2 minutes with a file and jobs a good en.  It's probably something peculiar to the throttle cable clamp on the FZS as my mate has a Kwak and he had no such issue.

His Dudeness

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Re: Fitting Spotlights
« Reply #27 on: 11 February 2019, 06:59:55 PM »
Looks good. Did you take the 12V from the Brown/Blue wire? Did you go for the relay option or just a wire? That Brown/Blue is the switched side of the ignition. It goes from the switched side of the ignition to the fuse box and gives switched 12V to all the fuses except the backup fuse. The brown/blue wire is protected by the main 30A fuse in the starter relay. That wire size is rated for 38A but the fuse blows at 30A to protect the wire. If you wanted you could work out roughly how many amps are flowing through the wire. You could do a worst case scenario as if you had everything turned on that gets power through that wire so high beams, low beams, indicators, horn, rear light, brake light, fuel pump, fan plus your Led's and grips and see if all that adds up to near 30A. You can get the power consumption values in Watts for all those things in the specifications part of the workshop manual then add in your leds and grips and divide the total Watts by 12 to give you amps. If it comes near 30A you could think about using a relay.

On a side note I've had a look at the loom. I was wondering how Yamaha does a splice connection and they use this style connector https://kojaycat.co.uk/15mm-1mm-U-Joint-Auto-Cable-Crimp

I think I'll invest in some of those style crimps and a proper crimping tool. There's always a bit of a question about what's the best way to make your connection to power aftermarket accessories. If Yamaha uses those crimps I will too :D


NOoooooooooooooooo! Solder and heat shrink every time, not only is it permanent it is also neat, and packs of differing colours and sizes of heat shrink are available on eBay.


Someone asked about the spot light mounting on a pole (see picture) I made the poles out of a set of mountain bike handle bars, and mounted them in the reinforcement web where the frame meet the steering head stock under the front of the tank.
Mounting them on the side of the rad is the easy option but if you drop you bike even at a standstill the are likely to wreck your radiator leaving you marooned if you a few miles from home, not forgetting a big bill to replace the rad.


PS: As the pole for my spots are made from alloy mountain bike  handlebars they will just bend if the bike is dropped or thrown up the road at speed and the mounts will not do any harm to the bike itself.

I like solder too but peel the tape off the loom and anywhere there's a splice Yamaha used those crimps not solder. They make a good connection. If you wanted you could use one of those crimps and solder the crimp! Then a bit of heat shrink over the top everyone's a winner :lol   




His Dudeness

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Re: Fitting Spotlights
« Reply #28 on: 11 February 2019, 07:07:23 PM »
The one wire I cut into was soldered. and then wrapped in heat shrink. 


All other connections were made using insulated bullet connectors which were then wrapped in heat shrink.  I then wrapped the lot in electrical tape so there are no connectors exposed.  It'll be a nightmare to unpick should anything fail.


As for the issue of potential damage with the spots mounted on the rad.......I've no immediate plans to lay my bike down on it's side.  Fingers crossed.


Having recently undertaken the fitting of both spotlights and heated grips I'm now in the position of being able to impart my knowledge if anybody else is seeking guidance.


For info the grips I used were the cheap Chinese type from Ebay.  I did so on the recommendation of a work colleague who rated them. 
Tell you what....they're pretty good, had to turn them down after 5 mins this morning.  They were only a tenner.  Only issue is that it's a throttle tube and grip in one and for some reason the collar for holding the cables was about 1mm too thick so when clamped down the throttle wouldn't release smoothly.  2 minutes with a file and jobs a good en.  It's probably something peculiar to the throttle cable clamp on the FZS as my mate has a Kwak and he had no such issue.
You could turn everything on and feel if the brown/blue wire is getting hot. If it is then use a relay to power the accessories. It's easy to add one in. Just connect the wire that's coming off the blue/brown to the control side of the relay, then the other side of the control to ground. Then connect a wire from battery+ to the relay switch, then the other side of the switch to your accessories. It means the extra current to power the accessories is coming straight from the battery through the relay rather than going through the bike wiring.

tommyardin

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Re: Fitting Spotlights
« Reply #29 on: 11 February 2019, 08:02:40 PM »
Looks good. Did you take the 12V from the Brown/Blue wire? Did you go for the relay option or just a wire? That Brown/Blue is the switched side of the ignition. It goes from the switched side of the ignition to the fuse box and gives switched 12V to all the fuses except the backup fuse. The brown/blue wire is protected by the main 30A fuse in the starter relay. That wire size is rated for 38A but the fuse blows at 30A to protect the wire. If you wanted you could work out roughly how many amps are flowing through the wire. You could do a worst case scenario as if you had everything turned on that gets power through that wire so high beams, low beams, indicators, horn, rear light, brake light, fuel pump, fan plus your Led's and grips and see if all that adds up to near 30A. You can get the power consumption values in Watts for all those things in the specifications part of the workshop manual then add in your leds and grips and divide the total Watts by 12 to give you amps. If it comes near 30A you could think about using a relay.

On a side note I've had a look at the loom. I was wondering how Yamaha does a splice connection and they use this style connector https://kojaycat.co.uk/15mm-1mm-U-Joint-Auto-Cable-Crimp

I think I'll invest in some of those style crimps and a proper crimping tool. There's always a bit of a question about what's the best way to make your connection to power aftermarket accessories. If Yamaha uses those crimps I will too :D


NOoooooooooooooooo! Solder and heat shrink every time, not only is it permanent it is also neat, and packs of differing colours and sizes of heat shrink are available on eBay.


Someone asked about the spot light mounting on a pole (see picture) I made the poles out of a set of mountain bike handle bars, and mounted them in the reinforcement web where the frame meet the steering head stock under the front of the tank.
Mounting them on the side of the rad is the easy option but if you drop you bike even at a standstill the are likely to wreck your radiator leaving you marooned if you a few miles from home, not forgetting a big bill to replace the rad.


PS: As the pole for my spots are made from alloy mountain bike  handlebars they will just bend if the bike is dropped or thrown up the road at speed and the mounts will not do any harm to the bike itself.

I like solder too but peel the tape off the loom and anywhere there's a splice Yamaha used those crimps not solder. They make a good connection. If you wanted you could use one of those crimps and solder the crimp! Then a bit of heat shrink over the top everyone's a winner :lol   





Good call, I like it.

Frosties

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Re: Fitting Spotlights
« Reply #30 on: 11 February 2019, 11:13:18 PM »
The one wire I cut into was soldered. and then wrapped in heat shrink. 


All other connections were made using insulated bullet connectors which were then wrapped in heat shrink.  I then wrapped the lot in electrical tape so there are no connectors exposed.  It'll be a nightmare to unpick should anything fail.


As for the issue of potential damage with the spots mounted on the rad.......I've no immediate plans to lay my bike down on it's side.


Nowt wrong with the electrical wiring fella - nice job.


Spots look good and I'm sure you notice the difference on the road AND the way others drivers react/see you. Same as me with the rad mount - least of my worries if the bike goes down.
Those are my principles...if you don't like them I have others.